Relafen mouth ulcer



by Nathan Wei, MD, FACP, FACR

Nathan Wei is a nationally known board-certified rheumatologist and author of the Second Opinion Arthritis Treatment Kit. It's available exclusively at this website... not available in stores.

Click here: Second Opinion Arthritis Treatment Kit




From the Relafen website

Important information to know about Relafen

• Take Relafen with food, milk, or an antacid to lessen stomach upset.
• Remaining upright (sitting or standing) for 15 to 30 minutes after each dose may prevent irritation of the esophagus (throat).
• If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day, Relafen may increase the risk of stomach bleeding.


•Relafen is in a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Relafen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.
•Relafen is used to reduce the pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.


•Relafen may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide


Before taking Relafen, tell your doctor if you

• have an allergy to aspirin or any other NSAIDs
• have an ulcer or bleeding in the stomach
• drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day
• have liver or kidney disease
• have a coagulation (bleeding) disorder
• have congestive heart failure
• have fluid retention
• have heart disease
• have high blood pressure


You may not be able to take Relafen, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you have any of the conditions listed above.

Relafen is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Relafen should not be taken late in pregnancy (the third trimester) because a similar drug is known to affect the baby's heart. Do not take Relafen without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether Relafen passes into breast milk Do not take this medicine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.



Take Relafen exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Take each dose with a full glass of water.

Taking Relafen with food, milk, or an antacid may lessen stomach upset.

Remaining upright (sitting or standing) for 15 to 30 minutes after each dose may prevent irritation of the esophagus (throat).

Store Relafen at room temperature away from moisture and heat.



Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose.



Symptoms of a Relafen overdose include nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, dizziness, drowsiness, headache, ringing in the ears, blurred vision, seizures, sweating, numbness or tingling, little or no urine production, and slow breathing.



Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. Relafen may increase the sensitivity of the skin to sunlight. Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing when exposure to the sun is unavoidable.

If you drink more than three alcoholic beverages a day, Relafen may increase the risk of stomach bleeding.



If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking Relafen and seek medical treatment or call your doctor immediately:

• an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives)
• muscle cramps, numbness, or tingling
• ulcers (open sores) in the mouth
• rapid weight gain (fluid retention)
• Seizures
• black, bloody or tarry stools
• blood in the urine or vomit
• decreased hearing or ringing in the ears
• jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes)
• abdominal cramping, indigestion, or heartburn


Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take Relafen and talk to your doctor if you experience


• dizziness or headache

• nausea, gaseousness, diarrhea, or constipation

• depression

• fatigue or weakness

• dry mouth

or

• irregular menstrual periods



Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

Mouth sores have been reported with all NSAIDS. Severe mouth sores may be a sign of a potentially fatal condition, called Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Seek medical attention if mouth sores persist or worsen.




Before taking Relafen, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following drugs:

• another nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) such as ibuprofen (Motrin, Rufen, others), ketoprofen (Orudis, Orudis KT, Oruvail), naproxen (Naprosyn, Aleve, Anaprox), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam), etodolac (Lodine), fenoprofen (Nalfon), flurbiprofen (Ansaid), indomethacin (Indocin), ketorolac (Toradol), oxaprozin (Daypro), piroxicam (Feldene), sulindac (Clinoril), tolmetin (Tolectin), celecoxib (Celebrex), valdecoxib (Bextra), or rofecoxib (Vioxx)

• aspirin or another salicylate (forms of aspirin) such as salsalate (Disalcid), choline salicylate, and magnesium salicylate (watch the aspirin content of other over-the-counter products such as cough, cold, and allergy medicines)

• a diuretic (water pill) such as hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, Hydrodiuril, others), chlorothiazide (Diuril, others), chlorthalidone (Thalitone), bumetanide (Bumex), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), spironolactone (Aldactone), and amiloride (Midamor)

• an angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), and others

• a beta-blockers such as acebutolol (Sectral), metoprolol (Lopressor), propranolol (Inderal), atenolol (Tenormin), carteolol (Cartrol), and others

• an anticoagulant such as warfarin (Coumadin)

• a steroid such as prednisone (Deltasone) or methylprednisolone (Medrol)

• an oral anti-diabetic drug such as glipizide (Glucotrol) and glyburide (Micronase, Diabeta)

• lithium (Eskalith, Lithobid, others)

• cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral)

You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking any of the medications listed above

Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with Relafen. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products

Two other points. Relafen is available as generic nabumatone. It, like all other NSAIDS is associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke.





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